Before

Before

WHITE CLAY CREEK STREAM BANK RESTORATION AND ENHANCEMENT
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The lower reaches of the Wild & Scenic White Clay Creek are susceptible to severe flooding due to high storm flows.  In addition, the stream banks are “soft” consisting of deposited sands and silts that are highly erodible. During the winter of 2009, a small log jam formed along the creek bank creating an accelerated erosion condition resulting in up to 10 feet of bank being lost over hundreds of feet in just a few months.   This severe erosion placed the fairway of the first hole at this golf course in jeopardy and was creating a public safety hazard.

 

During

During

CABE was contracted to design and permit a solution to eliminate the bank erosion and restore/enhance the stream bank.  During the design, a new bank stabilization technique was developed, referred to as “stunted log vanes.”  This technique was specifically developed for this project to stabilize the high, steep, and soft-soiled conditions at the golf course, and is the first of its kind in the region.  Unlike traditional vanes that are constructed primarily to deflect flow energy within the channel for the purposes of stabilizing a reach of stream, stunted vanes are designed strictly to protect the bank of the stream without affecting the existing flow directions.  These structures are embedded in the bank itself and become virtually invisible once the project is complete.  This technique is green, and offers a cost effective alternative to traditional hard armoring.

 

After

After

CABE provided a rapid design and permit acquisition, immediately followed by providing oversight on an eight day installation.
The client was very pleased with the results: “They jumped right in working side by side with everyone. I think it worked out very well.”

Approximately two months after the completion of the project, a 7.5 inch storm event occurred that kept the entire project site under water for nearly 36 hours.  When the water receded the work was fully intact.

Because of it’s excellence in design and implementation, this project received a Conceptor Award from Delaware’s American Council of Engineering Companies (ACEC).